Nanostructures and Computation Group Members

The Nanostructures and Computation Group is headed by Prof. Steven G. Johnson in the Department of Mathematics at MIT, who joined the MIT faculty in 2004.

Current Group Members

The current graduate and undergraduate students working in the group are (in decreasing order of seniority):



Photograph of Homer ReidM. T. Homer Reid (homereid ατ mit.edu) is a postdoctoral Instructor in applied mathematics at MIT. Homer's research is on advanced numerical methods in physics, such as developing boundary-element methods and integral-equation formulations of electromagnetism for Casimir forces, thermal radiation, and other applications. Office: 2-155.

photo of Adi PickAdi Pick (pick.adi ατ gmail.com) is a graduate student in the Harvard physics department, who received a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in physics from Tel-Aviv University, working on a project involving quantum fluctuations in lasers. Office: 8-313, x3-4780.

photo of Fan WangFan Wang (wangfan ατ mit.edu) is a graduate student in mechanical engineering at MIT, who received a Bsc in physics from Nanjing University and an MPhil from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, working on numerical modeling of nanofluidic flows in nanostructured geometries.

photo of Raphael PestourieRaphael Pestourie (pestourie ατ seas døt harvard.edu) is a graduate student in applied mathematics at Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Raphael's research is about optimization methods applied to design in nanophotonics. Co-advised by Professor Federico Capasso at Harvard. Office: 8-309.

photo of Eunnie LeeYoon Kyung "Eunnie" Lee (eunnie12 ατ mit.edu) is a graduate student in mechanical engineering at MIT, who received a B.S. from KAIST and an S.M. from MIT in mechanical engineering. She is working on the design and optimization of light-induced mechanical effects. Co-advised by Professor Nicholas X. Fang at MIT. Office: 3-473M.

photo of Wonseok ShinWonseok Shin (wsshin ατ mit.edu) is a postdoc and applied-math instructor, who received is PhD in 2013 from Stanford with Shanhui Fan. His work is focused on efficient techniques for solving large-scale 3D Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain. Office: 8-311 (also 2-232c), x3-5482.

photo of Mohammed BenzaouiaMohammed Benzaouia (medbenzaouia ατ gmail.com) is a graduate student in electrical engineering at MIT. He is currently working on adapting results from electromagnetic scattering theory to problems in ocean engineering. Office: 8-309.

photo of Wenjie YaoWenjie Yao (jayyao ατ mit.edu) is a graduate student in electrical engineering at MIT. He is currently working on problems involving metamaterials and rotating bodies. Office: 8-311, x3-5482.

Graduated group members


Former postdoctoral and visiting researchers

Former undergraduate researchers


Patrick Ledwidth was an undergraduate UROP student working on monotonicity theorems for dispersion relations and spectral inequalities in Maxwell equations in 2016.
Sandeep Silwal was an undergraduate UROP student working on numerical methods for special functions in Fall 2015.

Aryan Khojandi was an undergraduate math major working on fluid instabilities in extensional multilayered capillary flows.

Amyas Chew was an undergraduate physics major working on optical "billiard-ball" chaos, in collaboration with Prof. Yidong Chong at NTU.

Alejandro Garcia (acgarcia ατ mit.edu) worked on a UROP project involving integral-equation solvers and low-loss THz mirrors.

Amy Guyomard (amyguyomard ατ mit.edu) MIT mathematics, worked involving fluid instabilities in capillaries with strong thermal gradients.

Rodrigo Muñoz (rodmk ατ mit.edu), MIT computer science, worked on a UROP project involving the Pochoir compiler project for cache-oblivious stencil algorithms.

Thanard Kurutach (kurutach ατ mit.edu), MIT mathematics and EECS, working on a UROP project involving nonlinear eigenproblems arising in integral-equation formulations of electromagnetic scattering problems.

Rolando La Placa (laplaca ατ college.harvard.edu), an undergraduate physics major at Harvard, worked on light extraction for spontaneous emission.

Jorge Perez, MIT physics, worked on the computational modelling of Casimir forces in nanostructured geometries.

David Ramirez (d_ram ατ mit døt edu), MIT physics, worked on a UROP project involving intra-cavity nonlinear frequency conversion, co-advised by Prof. Marin Soljacic, resulting in this paper. Currently a graduate student in physics at Stanford.

Photograph of Jaime VarelaJaime Varela, MIT physics, worked on a UROP project involving multi-body Casimir interactions in fluids, resulting in this paper. Currently a graduate student in physics at Berkeley.

Photograph of Amy ZhangAmy Zhang, MIT EECS, worked on a UROP project involving perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries.


Issac Buenrostro, worked on adaptive mesh-refinement for integral-equation Casimir-force computations. Currently at Stanford.

Arthur Parzygnat, an undergraduate at Queen's college (class of 2010) who spent the summer of 2009 working on a project involving rigorous conditions for localization in band gaps, resulting in this paper.

Thanasin Nampaisarn is an undergraduate physics/math student at MIT from Thailand who worked on a summer project involving simultaneous localization of light and sound by simultaneous three-dimensional phononic and photonic band gaps.

Nathan Lachenmyer is an undergraduate in the physics department who worked on a summer UROP project involving quantum Casimir torques.

Photograph of Bryn WaldwickBryn Waldwick (waldwick ατ mit døt edu) worked on a UROP project involving bending losses in hollow-core Bragg fibers. He is also on the MIT golf team, and enjoys playing basketball as well as the saxophone and guitar.

Photo of Ruitian LangRuitian Lang (percyl ατ mit døt edu) worked on a UROP project involving adiabatic theorems in discrete (or discretized) systems in Fall 2007.

Photo of Xuancheng Shao Xuancheng Shao (zero ατ mit.edu) worked on UROP projects in 2006 and 2007 involving minimal-arithmetic algorithms for discrete cosine and sine transforms (published here and here).


Go back to the group web page, or see our publications and preprints.